Raw Oatghurt w Spruce Tip Honey + Edible Obsessions

Posted by: on Maj 25, 2014 | 58 Comments

[DIY] Raw Oatghurt w Spruce Tip Honey on www.Earthsprout.com

I have gotten into the habit of calling Caspian ”mitt lilla havre” (my little oat) and it must sound, well.. a bit weird. You see, I not only have a Pantry Obsession .. I am pretty obsessed with oats too. Whole oats, steel cut oats, oat flakes, sprouted oats, oats in porridge, golden oat fields, oatotto, oat milk and best of all..oatghurt (thank goodness for the a-mazing swedish company Oatly. Seriously). Naturally this has a lot to do with me favoring crops that are well suited for the Swedish climate (hello hemp, millet, flax and other cool stuff) and the things I’ve been surrounded by all my life. Quite a few of my so-called obsessions explode in todays recipe. Honey, Oats, Spruce Tips, Yoghurt, Foraging, Bees, Edible flowers, Culture and *ahem* Caspian (just a lil nibble..)

Food is dreams, history, culture, goals, play and in many cases, dear memories. Foraging for wild spruce tips with Caspian in our Mandala Ergo, him sleeping under a tree (see pic below), walking home again to put those bright green spruce tips into a jar of my granddad’s friends golden honey. Carefully and lovingly fermenting Swedish oats (I mean really lovingly, this gal right here shares many secrets with her fermenting projects while taking care of em’). Smelling lilacs in the morning sun then spreading them over these breakfast bowls. Picking up the camera only to realize the glass of the lens is entirely crushed, accepting the situation and shooting the recipe with it (so if you notice any odd shadows in the pics, now you know why).

..It is and will always be about ridiculous over the top live-in-the-moment love-filled sacred medicine and oh my god pleasure for our souls. It won’t ever be about simply fueling the body. So as you can see, this recipe is not only a recipe. It’s a collision of my heritage, my heart and my love for Mama Earth. I will never give you random Greenylicious recipes just for the sake of it on Earthsprout. I strive to serve with a whole lotta high vibe love and thought put into every single post. However, I would say that this is a special one as it’s actually been sitting on my note of ideas forever just waiting for the right moment to come. My tastebuds and my body says thank goodness that moment finally came! My hope is that your’s will too.

[DIY] Raw Oatghurt w Spruce Tip Honey on www.Earthsprout.com
[DIY] Raw Oatghurt w Spruce Tip Honey on www.Earthsprout.com

Fun & Fabulous Facts

Bees are all the buzz. Really. This is a hot topic in need of our caring attention (and some putting on our hard core superhero costume too). Bee that need to live are dying all over the world. These enormously intelligent beings need us to open our eyes and step up. And no, it’s not just about the immensely  nutritious/ delicious honey, we rely on bees to pollinate 1/3 of what we eat meaning we’re pretty lost without them. The twisted truth is that our search for cheaper food and larger and more even harvests is the same thing that’s killing bees. Bee-keeping should be about care, love and respect, not controlling big business. It all breaks my heart. Let’s not have it this way. Let’s change it. How? Chose organic, go local, support kind. And hey! A flat boring lawn? Screw it. Enter the Greenylicious revolution. Read more on the topic in THIS Fun & Fabulous Facts-section


Open any health-oriented book/website and gluten-free seems to be the Golden Gate to all things fantastic. While I don’t think that’s entirely true I do give the advise to cut back on (any) refined grains if you’re in search for a health boost and long term wellbeing. Chances are you’ve stumbled upon a package of ”gluten-free oats” and thought that will be the only way you’ll ever consume oats again but the thing is, oats are naturally gluten-free. It’s just that they may have been handled in an environment where the also work with wheat/rye/barley. Oats rock and making yoghurt with these gems will rock your socks off! The live bacteria in fermented foods are such miracle workers and will support your gut-health (the mother of a healthy body) tremendously. The Lactic acid bacteria in this yoghurt (present in all un pasteurized fermented foods) will help the body to produce it’s own natural antibiotics, anti-carcinogenic compounds and will even produce certain compounds that inactivates toxins! Read more on the oaty topic in THIS Fun & Fabulous-section


..So, Spruce tips? Really? Yeah! Get onboard! These tiny shoots are quite miraculous, providing us with enormous amounts of Vitamin C and a surprising flavor experience. Spruce tips has long been used by indigenous tribes for relieveing choghs, soar thoughts and as a boost of Vitamin C during wintertime. One way of preserving spruce tips is gently drying them and keep for tea, baking, addition to smoothies or such but here I’ve chosen to make a spruce tip honey! When I first tried spruce tip honey a few years back I couldn’t believe it’s taste. Imagine a crazy concoction of strawberries, candy, lemon and liquorice. That’s spruce tip honey. Dip a chashew nut in this and you’ll go straight to honey heaven. Harvesting spruce tips for this jar of honey (1 handfull) will take you around one minute so while you’re at it, why not harvest some more to make tea/jam/sweet pesto or something else fun! For best result and taste harvest the tips of evergreen trees when they first begin to emerge from their golden papery casings (see pic below). If they’ve passed this stage, simply try one to see if it still tastes good and lemony, in which case you’re good to go, or if it’s too hard and bitter. Note: pregnant women are advised not to consume spruce tips.

[DIY] Raw Oatghurt w Spruce Tip Honey on www.Earthsprout.com[DIY] Raw Oatghurt w Spruce Tip Honey on www.Earthsprout.com [DIY] Raw Oatghurt w Spruce Tip Honey on www.Earthsprout.com

Raw Oatghurt + Spruce Tip Honey

These two recipes may seem like big projects at first glance but they are actually less time consuming then making a hearty salad with all the trimmings. I wanted to give you a very simple recipe for an Oatghurt that tastes great, is easy to make but still lets you reap the benefits of eating fermented foods. Raw oats can sometimes be a tad bitter but I absolutely prefer using steel cut oats for the nutritional punch (regular rolled oats are steamed). If you want your yoghurt to taste well, less, then go for 50% steel cut oats and 50% rolled oats. The addition of spruce tip honey is really perfect here. Adding some berries to the natural Oatghurt and then blending it up is also very tasty. Or using it in a smoothie/ ice cream/ dip/ with a fruit salad.. You get the idea.

Oatghurt – notes

  • How long does it take? This depends on how tangy you desire the oatghurt it to be. Normally it’s ready within 2-4 days. Follow you own nose and tastebuds here as the fermentation process is different every time depending on factors like room temperature and ingredients. You’ll notice how it gets tastier and tastier with each hour that goes by, it’s a really interesting process to take part of. Remember that the end of the process will be quicker so at day 3 or even 4 you’ll need to ckeck on the oatghurt more often to prevent it from going bad. Better take it a little earlier then too late.
  • Keep a starter. Once you’ve made one batch add 1/3 cup of that batch when making a new one. It will serve as a little live starter full of good bacteria and make the fermentation process a bit quicker. Keeps refrigerated for 1 week. 
  • Use wooden utensils. Since you’re working with live bacteriametal might interfere with the process so when making/stirring the oatghurt only use wooden utensils and preferably ceramic or glass bowls/containers . Our special love-carved spoon that you see in the pictures is made by my super cool friend (and very talented wood designer) Moa Ott.
  • A good fermentation spot is important. Keep the bowl of fermenting oatghurt in a warm, undisturbed and draft-free place during the fermentation process. If you want to give it a kickstart or if the weather is really cold, a good idea is to place the bowl in the oven with only the light on for the first 8-24 hours.
  • Make GF Sourdough bread/pancakes/pizza using the (unsweetened) oatghurt that will serve as a kickass sourdough. Recipe for GF sourdough pizza HERE

Ingredients
3 cup steel cut oats (or 1.5 cup steel cup oats + 1.5 cup rolled oats for a more neutral flavor but less nutritional punch)

3 cup pure water
1/4 tsp pure ground vanilla bean or vanilla essence
3 drops good quality stevia concentrate / pinch green powdered stevia OR 1 tbsp liquid natural sweetener of choice

1. Add oats to a ceramic/glass/metal bowl and cover with water overnight 
2. In the morning, rinse thoroughly then add the oats along with the 3 cups pure water to a high speed blender and blend until very, very smooth. It will be really runny but firms up after only a few hours.
3. Add back into the bowl, cover with a damp kitchen towel and keep in a warm, undisturbed and draft-free place during the fermentation process.
4. Stir once or twice every day and make sure the kitchen towel is kept damp. Most times it takes me 3-4 days of fermenting until I’m pleased with how sour the oatghurt is.
5. When you are pleased with the sourness of your Oatghurt, place it in the blender with vanilla and sweetener of choice, blend then refrigerate. If you want a less thick Oatghurt add some spoonfuls of water with the vanilla+sweetener.
6. Oatghurt stays fresh for 5-ish days in the 
refrigerator.

Spruce Tip Honey

1 handful fresh spruce tips
5 tbsp raw honey (local + organic, please)

1. Add your fresh spruce tips and raw honey to a clean glass jar. Let sit on your window in the sunshine for a couple of weeks then keep in a dark place. You’ll be able to taste the interesting and bold flavor after only 2 days but the longer you wait the more intense and amazing it will get.

[DIY] Raw Oatghurt w Spruce Tip Honey on www.Earthsprout.com[DIY] Raw Oatghurt w Spruce Tip Honey on www.Earthsprout.com

 

What can you do Today to support the marvelous honey bees of this earth? Taking action creates change regardless if it’s to never again buy conventional, imported honey or quit cutting the grass on your lawn or exclusively opting for organic food or telling a friend about what’s going on with the bee population. Be the game changer and let us know in the comments below what you’re planning to do!

All Honey Love

°°Elenore°° + lil’ fam

 


As we’re journeying together, share your creations, inspirations and ideas with the rest of the loving community using the hashtag #Earthsprout #oatghurt on Instagram and Twitter


 

 

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58 Comments

  1. Elle
    25 maj, 2014

    Gorgeous post. Food is so far beyond simply fuel; personally, I am crazy grateful for the feeling of connection to the earth, culture, and family that (local, pure, wholesome, & delicious) food provides. As for bees, I plan to continue saying ”No to Monsanto” by avoiding purchasing products owned by GM-supporting corporations. ”Buycott” is an iPhone app that’s a very useful tool in tracking down corporate ownership in food.

    Reply
  2. Anonymus
    26 maj, 2014

    Lovely post!
    I wished more people would follow the greenlicious way of life!
    (Unfortunately a lot of people I try to convince always wave me away, telling it to be ”too expensive and time consuming”…really?!)
    Anyway I’m glad Mother Nature has such inspiring persons like you, who continue to fight for Mother Natures Rights! You rock!

    When I was first started learning cooking I also loved the idea of compositions that inherit from experience, traditions, preferences and love.
    Unfortunately being a perfectionist, I started to developed some wrecked relationship with food. (Some say I might have an eating disorder)
    Food doesn’t satisfy me anymore, neither taste wise nor mentally…
    But thanks to your inspiring post I still keep up the hope to get back into a normal relationship with food again! (E,g trying your delicious recipes and giving myself time and space to enjoy)
    Basically I wanted to thank you for providing a lot of inspiration, information and hope in every of your post! Thank you.

    (little question on the recipe
    you mention steel cut oats
    where I live I haven’t found any, what if I run whole oat groats through a blender, might that count too? ;)

    Reply
  3. Nickie
    26 maj, 2014

    Elenore, dear one…a beautiful post and I am looking forward to making this oatghurt! On my little 5 acre piece of earth here in California we must be careful with land use, water use and most especially caring for the insect world that helps us in so many ways. We have planted pollinator attracting plants everywhere and put up little mason bee houses to attract these wonders. Much of the wilder areas are left alone. We try and have a small footprint. Our garden area is not neat but busy with bugs and flowers that attract the pollinators. The marjoram which started as a small plant is now everywhere and about to bloom. The bees love it! Plant some marjoram (a bit like oregano)! I will go into the high country to find spruce tips. I remember reading a story where Russian soldiers ate spruce tips for their Vitamin C. So clever to add them to honey! Thank you for your gentle soul and inspiring ideas…lovingly, Nickie

    Reply
  4. Arlette
    26 maj, 2014

    This sounds a fantastic recipe – just wondering if I can use whole oats and even if it would be good to sprout them first? Just love your posts – they are getting better and better x

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      26 maj, 2014

      Hi Arlette! You can absolutely use whole oats, I’ve tried that too. No need to fully sprout them though, they will be activated by that first night of soaking. Hugs! Ps. thank you for that huge compliment! <3

      Reply
  5. Arlette
    26 maj, 2014

    Ps do you add the vanilla and sweetener before or after the fermentation process?

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      26 maj, 2014

      Afterwards! I blend it all up once the fermentation process is done!

      Reply
  6. Lene
    26 maj, 2014

    Good morning :)
    What a beautiful post and the recipe sounds so delicious! I am wondering if I have to heat up the mix a little bit, as it is quite cold here in New Zealand in winter during the day. Do you think it will be better to heat it up a little in a pot or in the oven?

    Have a wonderful day :)

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      26 maj, 2014

      Hi Lene!

      That’s a good idea if the weather is really cold. You can give the fermentation process a lil’ kickstart by placing it in the oven at lowest temp for 24h. What I’ve noticed though is that the most important thing is that the place you then leave the bowl to ferment is calm and draft-free. Best of luck!

      Reply
  7. Kathleen
    26 maj, 2014

    Love this!! Thank you so much!

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      27 maj, 2014

      Thank you for bringing all your love here Kathleen!

      Reply
  8. Leticia Z
    26 maj, 2014

    I love this recipe but have the same question as Arlette!
    Also, do you think it would be ok to ad some probiotic, such as rejuvelac or even a probiotic capsules content, as a fermentation agent?
    Thanks!

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      27 maj, 2014

      Oh absolutely, yes you can! I chose not to in this case simply to make it more accessible to everyone. But of course you can! Play around and have heaps of fun! Hugs!

      Reply
  9. Arlette
    27 maj, 2014

    Thanks so much for your comments Elenore – I now have my first batch of oatghurt on the go. Just wondering if you added a probiotic like Liticia suggests do you need to be careful not to overdo the amount? And do you know if the nutritional benefits are similar to ordinary yogurt (if there is such a thing)? This is all so amazingly inventive – might it work with buckwheat or quinoa too…
    Little Casper is so cute x

    Reply
  10. Anne-Marie
    28 maj, 2014

    Hi Eleonore,

    My new addiction is your blog! Every post is filled with such interesting and nutritious facts as well as delicious (and completly new!) recipes and of course LOVE! And since we live in the same kind of climate, I enjoy even more reading about your ways of using local food…

    I live in the Yukon Territory in Northern Canada and we collect spruce tips every spring. I usually make pesto…All that’s needed is soaked nuts, spruce tips, garlic and anything you want to add! Spruce tip salt (amazing in soups & salads) and spruce tip jam are also among my favorites! I also freeze some of my spruce tips for the year to come and it works really well too..Can’t wait to try the spruce tip honey!

    And Oatghurt..wow! That’s sounds amazing!

    Anne-Marie

    Reply
  11. Sara
    28 maj, 2014

    Hi Elenore !
    Can you advise on a good brand of stevia ?

    Thank you so much,
    have a wonderful day !

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      29 maj, 2014

      I’m using a brand called Sweet Leaf Liquid Stevia after carefully and throughly searching the marked for a high quality kind. Although I do use it sparingly and opt for either other sweeteners or green dry stevia leaves often.

      Reply
  12. The Naked Fig
    28 maj, 2014

    My most recent recipe was almost spruce tip ice cream with spruce honey! We must have been feeling the same vibes. But then I saw figs in the market for the first time this season and changed gears. I still have some spruce tips though so I will definitely be trying this! YUM

    Reply
  13. Arlette
    29 maj, 2014

    My oatghurt is fermenting nicely – it is very bubbly and quite mellowy sweet, I think I’ll let it get a little bit more sour before I tuck in. Is that better nutritionally? I’m wondering if it could be used as a sourdough starter, for example, in Sarah B’s ‘Life Changing loaf’…

    Reply
  14. Arienette
    30 maj, 2014

    I just want to thank you for your amazing blog. It gives me inspiration to eat healthy and be creative in the kitchen. For me your blog is at the top of my foodbloglist. The reason is your beautiful photos and the fact that you dare to share thoughts and moments from your private life. I love the pictures of you and your familys every day life and they give me hope of one day having my own house with a big organic garden and my own family living happily there. Hopefully my fiancee and i soon have our own little sprout. Your sincere story about your diffuculties being pregnant moved me deeply as well as gave me lots of faith in the miracles of nature.

    Thank you!

    Reply
  15. Arlette
    30 maj, 2014

    Just had to update you – the finished result is amazing, really delicious, a bit like a yogurty Bircher muesli. I’m going to experiment with lots of different flavours. I tried banana with lime juice and zest – was so tropical and yummy. Thanks for sharing your wisdom…

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      31 maj, 2014

      Oh wow! Banana + lime? Genius! Thank you so much for letting us all know! Love!

      Reply
  16. hannah
    30 maj, 2014

    I’m definitely gonna try this! I made my first cashew yoghurt (with a probiotic) a few weeks ago and loved it!
    Also soooo excited to come to Sweden, only Oatly milk and cream are available in the UK, I had no idea they did yoghurt and ice cream YUM!!
    Also your little boy is toooo cute! I totally see why you wanna eat him up. He has beautiful eyes :)
    Sending love!

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      31 maj, 2014

      Darling Hannah, thank you for your sweet sweet words! I bet you’ll love oatghurt then! ..and so glad you’ll be coming here! Have the best of travels! Hugs!

      Reply
  17. ifi
    2 juni, 2014

    Hi Elanore,

    I was wondering; since I do not have a high speed blender, can I grind the oats into a flour, and then mix in the water?

    By the way, your ”little oat” is pretty cute!

    Thanks for sharing this recipe.

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      2 juni, 2014

      Hi there! Just blend it up with an immersion blender afterwards instead, it will work just fine! :) Good luck! Thank YOU! Hugs!

      Reply
  18. Marlies
    2 juni, 2014

    I love this post! I’m so glad you appreciate and believe in the power of food beyond just nourishment. I agree, some of the best memories are created around food! And it tastes so good! It makes me sad when people don’t care about food beyond just not being hungry anymore. Sigh. So glad people like you are vocal and can beautifully express these thoughts!!

    I can’t wait to try the oatghurt! I love the tang of yogurt but I am trying to cut dairy, and have been missing yogurt terribly. This sounds like the perfect solution :)

    Reply
  19. Michelle
    4 juni, 2014

    I’m definitely on board with saving our bees! I love my veggies! I just planted my first veggie/flower garden in my front yard-yep I have forgone the grass lawn! As you mention the bees I’m going to seek some flowers that are bee friendly and add it to the garden.

    I support local farmers, buy 99% organic, compost and now have a garden :)

    The oatghurt looks intriguing to try (I’m dairy-free) and your baby is just too CUTE!

    Reply
  20. Felicity
    9 juni, 2014

    Hi Elenore

    Since I don’t have access to steel cut oats, will this recipe work with 3 cups rolled oats instead? Also, will this taste ok with no sweetener at all and maybe cinnamon instead?

    Thanks for your help!

    Cheers,
    Felicity

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      9 juni, 2014

      Hi Felicity!

      I haven’t tried making it with only steel cut oats but I’d be curious to know how it went! If you can get hold of whole oats (oat groats) that works very well too. I love my Oatghurt unsweetened but I’m pretty used to non crazy sweet stuff..;) I bet you are too.

      All the best!

      Reply
      • Felicity
        10 juni, 2014

        Hi Elenore,

        Thanks for the reply! I’ll try it with just rolled oats and see how it goes then report back on here for anyone interested.

        Do you think this would work in a yoghurt maker because that would create the warm environment for fermentation? My apartment is icy and I don’t usually have the heater on, so I thought maybe using the yoghurt maker (and adding new boiling water once or twice a day) might work better than just leaving it out. What are your thoughts on this?

        Cheers,
        Felicity

        Reply
        • ElenoreEarth
          11 juni, 2014

          If it’s as you say that your apartment is ice cold then that might be a good idea. Either that or give the fermentation process a kickstart by keeping it in the oven with only the lights on for the first 24 hours. Either way, let us know:)

          Reply
  21. kathleen
    9 juni, 2014

    Oh thank you for this wonder recipe. My partner and I are fermenting everything at the moment! We have some oven dried tomatoes fermenting right now! I can’t wait to give this a try, my breakfasts are going to get so much more delicious!
    As for the bees…raw local honey is what I do. Planting lots of flowers and trying to encourage others to do the same!thank you for the wonderful recipe. X

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      9 juni, 2014

      Sounds so exciting with the fermented tomatoes! I’m totally trying that! Thanks for the tip!

      Reply
  22. kirsty
    9 juni, 2014

    Hello elenore.
    Thank you for this post and your beautiful creations and of course for sharing your beauty.
    I cant wait to try this, was just wondering if i can use just rolled oats as I cant find steel oats anywhere.

    Thank you
    Much love. xxx

    Reply
    • Felicity
      10 juni, 2014

      Hi Kirsty,

      Elenore replied to me because I asked this exact same question.

      ”I haven’t tried making it with only steel cut oats but I’d be curious to know how it went! If you can get hold of whole oats (oat groats) that works very well too.”

      Please report back if you try it with just rolled oats cos that’s what I want to do! Thanks :)

      Reply
      • Fern
        12 juni, 2014

        Hi Kirsty and Felicity!

        I wanted to quickly say that I have tried the Oatghurt successfully with only rolled oats. I wanted to try the recipe straight away but only had rolled oats in the house so just went for it. ”Avena” (my name for the fermenting oats) started to ferment quickly and I moved her into the fridge on the third day. I sat her next to my rye sourdough starter, and I bake sourdough regularly, so she might have been so successful because of all of the good bacteria and yeast around. I hope it works as well for you both!

        And dear Elenore, thank you so much for this wonderful creation! I think it really is a life-changer for me!

        Reply
        • Felicity
          25 juni, 2014

          Thanks for the feedback Fern! :)

          Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      11 juni, 2014

      Hi Kirsty! Yes you can absolutely do that. If you can find whole oat groats you can also use those! Than YOU for being here!

      Reply
  23. Lexi
    10 juni, 2014

    Quick question… I read that adding a tbsp of raw apple cider vinegar to the soaking water of the steel cut oats also helps activate phytase to break down more phytic acid. Would it be okay if I added that to my soaking water? Just don’t want to mess up the fermentation process :)

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      11 juni, 2014

      Hi Lexi! You can absolutely do that although the fermentation process will break down the phytic acid too :)

      Reply
  24. Sofia
    10 juni, 2014

    Hi!

    Thank you so much for this post. I had to immediately do it. However, I made the mistake of putting the sweetener after blending the soaked oats and before the fermentation. It has been about 40 h and it doesn’t look ok (I guess). Do you think it will still work?

    Thank you in advance!

    Cheers and keep inspiring us!

    Sofia

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      11 juni, 2014

      Hi Sofia!

      Depending on the temperature of where you’re keeping the Oatghurt the fermentation process still might have not kicked in after 40 hours. Meaning, it could still work (in fact I’m guessing it will work). Fingers crossed and let me know!

      Reply
  25. Lwyne
    11 juni, 2014

    Hi !

    My yogurt is fermenting. I hope it will work! Do you think I can use almonds with this method?

    Thank you in advance.

    Lwyne

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      11 juni, 2014

      Lovely! I haven’t tried but let me know if you do!

      Reply
      • Lwyne
        11 juni, 2014

        Now I’m waiting for my Oat yogurt. Then I will try with almonds. Do you think I should rather use white almonds or almonds with skin? I have a high speed blender so no problem.
        Other question : your friend who makes very beautiful spoons and others, does she send ??? I would very very happy with such spoons.

        Reply
  26. vanessa
    11 juni, 2014

    Hi Elenore!

    Thank you for the great recipe! I started it on Sunday and I have been placing it on top of my oven- is it possible for it to get too warm for the fermentation to work properly? And I was wondering about keeping the 1/3 cup oatgurt for the next batch- how long can I keep it in the fridge before I start the next one? Thanks!

    Vanessa

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      11 juni, 2014

      Hi Vanessa!

      Great questions! (..and I’m so happy you´re fermenting, sister!). The risk of keeping it too hot is that the fermentation process will be so quick (the good bacteria will eat all their food, bad bacteria will form and then it’s good bye with that batch). If you keep the bowl on a hot place like that the batch can smell and taste and seem perfectly fine in the morning but have gone bad only three hours later. So.. It’s better to take it a bit chill and let check in on the oatghurt a bit more often after the 2nd day. Good luck! Oh! The starter! No more then one week <3

      Reply
  27. Marlies
    13 juni, 2014

    My oatghurt just finished fermenting last night! WOW! It’s so so so so delicious! I have been missing yogurt so much since I’ve been trying to cut out dairy, and the oatghurt mixed with fruit, coconut flakes, chia seeds and cinnamon made for a perfect breakfast. I am so greatful for this recipe, and I’ll be making it often from now on. :)

    I have one question – when I first blended the oats, the mixture was very thick, but after two days of fermenting, it became much thinner (along with very bubbly, which I assume was good!). Is this normal, or does it mean that the bacteria ran out of food?

    Thanks!

    Reply
  28. Marcela
    26 juni, 2014

    Dear Eleonore! thanks so much for sharing all your experiments in the kitchen in such a beautiful way. I am in day 2 of my first batch and was wondering how to know if it went bad. This morning it was a bit runny at the top and I expected it to become denser instead. I mixed it and seems normal, but I want to make sure I know the signs of a bad batch since I have never tried a good one.
    Thanks a lot!

    Reply
    • Weezie
      1 juli, 2014

      Marcela!

      I was kind of wondering the same thing… Mine got pretty thin/runny and had a smell more reminiscent of Parmesan cheese rather than yogurt. Did yours do the same? Can’t decide if I should toss and try again…

      Thanks!
      Weezie

      Reply
      • ml
        9 juli, 2014

        I just saw these comments. I guess this is a common issue?!

        Reply
  29. ml
    9 juli, 2014

    I just finished my first batch of oatghurt! Unfortunately, I believe I did something wrong. It ended up being much thinner than after the first blending and had a pungent almost cheesy smell and taste. Needless to say, I discarded the batch because no amount of maple syrup could mellow it’s flavors. Did I do something completely wrong?

    Reply
  30. Petra
    18 juli, 2014

    Hi Elenore

    I have found your recipe for Oatghurt last week and made some – I love it. As a vegan I dearly miss the sourness of yoghurt and cream cheese and feel lucky to have found an option. Thank you very much! I overlooked the part with the wooden spoon by the way and used a normal metal spoon, it worked very well as well :)

    Looking forward to your future recipes,
    Petra

    Reply
  31. Felicity
    19 juli, 2014

    Hi Elenore

    Can you ferment raw buckwheat in the same way you describe with oat groats? I’m all for the oatghurt and I’m not gluten intolerant and while I know you can buy gluten free oats, I figured that if it worked raw fermented buckwheat yoghurt would be a cool alternative for Gf friends.

    Thanks
    Felicity

    Reply
  32. Verena
    22 juli, 2014

    Dear Elenore,

    first of all THANK YOU for your lovely blog! It’s gorgeous and I love reading it :-)

    As to the oatghurt I’ve got a question: I started fermenting the oats yesterday morning. It became very bubbly which was quite cool. When I wanted to stir the oatghurt the other evening, it smelled like milk that’s gone bad or even like… cheesy feet. The texture is ok, I think, though still bubbly. So, I’m wondering whether the smell is a sign of rottenness or whether it’s meant to smell this way…

    Reply
  33. Sheryl
    19 augusti, 2014

    Hi Elenore,

    Thank you so much for this lovely post! Quick question – did anyone else find that their oatghurt got quite a bit runnier on the second day of fermentation? Mine has turned from a thick consistency to very runny, almost like nut milk. Any suggestions?

    Thank you :)

    Sheryl

    Reply

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