Warm bean & farro salad w horseradish cream

Posted by: on Okt 16, 2013 | 15 Comments

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I’m sitting here in the break of dawn on my own.

The house is dark and a few feet away I hear the deep breaths of Fabian sleeping and the little sweet noises of Caspian sleeping right next to him.

I love these moments before a new day starts. They seem stolen, far from ”reality” and with all possibilities still intact. Not to mention magical.

So I sit here in the break of dawn wondering what’s really real.

Fabian and I had an intense and fun talk last night, taking turns rocking Caspian in our arms and eating dinner. The focus of our talk? Reality. It’s not fixed, there is nothing that is set in stone and there are always other dimensions seeping through the barriers that we set up. It’s just up to us how thick we make those barriers and how much fresh possibility air we dare letting in. Allowing that air to enter is brave, it means not solely hiding behind schedules, computer screens, structures or ideas of how things (or you for that matter) are supposed to be. It means stepping out of comfort zones where we are safe and held.

..and we all know it’s outside of our comfort zones and structures, in the definite outskirts of the solidly ”real” things – where the magic happens.

So I sit here in the break of dawn wondering about the barriers of structures that me and Fabian have set up in our life together. How much we rely on them and how ”happy” they make us. How much they are keeping us from breathing that possibility air and much magic we keep out by thinking those structures are what matters. I feel like flying. I feel like it’s time we really fly.

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Fun & Fabulous Facts

I remember there were horseradish growing wild in our garden when I was little but still it took a long time for me to actually try it.. and love it. The most common way to eat horseradish today is some tired ”horseradish” sauce that actually barely contains any of this spectacular root. My wild guess is that we won’t see any of the brilliant health benefits when consuming horseradish from those kinds of products. Let’s go with the source which in this case is a makes-my-tastebuds-jump root of the Brassicaceae family. The flavor of freshly grated horseradish really is no joke and it will come as no surprise that it’s related to both mustard and wasabi. It clears up sinus-related infections rather quickly (as you will notice by only smelling it) while also providing powerful anti inflammatory and antibacterial properties. Conclusion; horseradish is a great thing to incorporate during this cold/flu season. Resent studies indicate that the traditional use of horseradish against cancer might actually be very spot on since it seems to increase human resistance to cancer. It’s the Glucosinulates that are all the rage in these studies, compounds that excist in all Brassicacea vegetables but are 10 times more present in horseradish than broccoli for example. The Glucosinulates increases the livers ability to detoxify carcinogens so obviously we’re talking about quite a rad root here.

Note: Raw horseradish is quite powerful and should be treated that way when consumed as food. Some people say all pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid it completely or at least not enjoy it on a regular basis.

Farrobeans

Warm whole bean farro salad w horseradish cream

This simple looking salad is quite something and the horseradish cream definitely adds that extra pizzazz to the creation. A perfect warm hearty salad with extra anti-flu powers for colder fall days. ..and ain’t those colorful beans a sight for sore eyes?! Ps. Fabian may or may not have said this was the tastiest thing he had eaten in ages (wihoo!)

Serves 4
Salad

800g fresh beans (both whole and sans pods)
1 small red onion
2 cups leafy greens (I used rainbow chard)
1 tbsp virgin olive oil
2 cups whole-grain farro
5 cups vegetable stock

1. Cover the farro with cold water in a large bowl and let soak for minimum 8 hours. Then give them a rinse and add to the simmering vegetable stock. Cook for around 30 minutes or until tender.
2. Steam the beans until soft (if you don’t have a steamer this is easily done by adding the beans to a colander, putting a lid on it and placing it over a pot of boiling water for a couple of minutes depending on the size and freshness of the beans).
3. Thinly slice the onion, rinse the greens and combine the whole salad in a bowl. Drizzle over the olive oil.

Horseradish cream
1 ripe avocado
3 tbsp light tahini
5 tbsp water
1/2 lemon, the zest
2 1/2 tbsp peeled and freshly grated horseradish root

1. Halve, pit and scoop out the avocado into a food processor, add the rest of the ingredients and blend into a light cream. This can be done using and immersion blender as well.

Enjoy fall in all it’s greenylicious glory while eating the salad!

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By now that break of dawn has turned into a full blown morning (!) but my intention is still the same, I’m ready to peel of some layers of structure and safety to get into the core of the goodstuff. To the possibility land and to the magic.

Are you up for doing the same? How do you seek the real behind the ”real”! (I know, please be more vague Elenore ;)

All greatness to your day, love!

°°Elenore°°

15 Comments

  1. Sarah
    16 oktober, 2013

    Looking afresh at everything you think you know … loosening your grip on life… that’s something I’ve been practicing since the summer … intermittently!
    Thank you for taking time from your new family to bring us more deliciousness. I had your farro and sesame milk breakfast this morning. So good!

    Reply
  2. Harriet
    16 oktober, 2013

    It amazes me how suddenly in one moment we can see the world with completely fresh eyes, and from a perspective we’ve never imagined. We are the creators of our own reality!

    This recipe, in anyone’s reality I’m sure, looks so wholesome and delicious. I’m a big fan of anything sinus clearing (I find it great for my asthma), and I’ve never really tried horseradish, so I’m going to have to keep my eyes peeled now.

    I really hope Fabian and Caspian and you are wonderful and magnificent – I loved the photos your shared recently. :)

    Reply
  3. Chelsea
    16 oktober, 2013

    Every once in a while I have those moments where I realize I can do anything, not just what I had planned to do next. The only boundaries are the ones we create for ourselves. I’m sure you and Fabian and your sweet little one will do magical things. Follow your intuition, sister.
    And…
    Oh my gosh! That horseradish cream sounds so good. Watch out world because I’m going to put it on everything. I don’t know if its the cold weather or what but I am on a major spicy food kick. But I never would have thought to make a cream of it with avocado. Pure brilliance, Elenore.

    Reply
  4. Gunhild
    17 oktober, 2013

    Here’s a use for horseradish for you: My mother-in-law taught us to do this whenever we get a cold or a bronchitis or anything to do with lungs: Grate fresh horseradish onto a kitchen towel, fold it together to a flat package and lay it onto your bare chest. Put a fusion on top and keep it there for as long as you can. It burns like hell and fury and in the beginning I could only keep it there for a few seconds. Now I’m getting better at it and it really, really helps. It’s very logical really, because the horseradish ups the circulation in the specific area. You could also put the horseradish cloth on your back, at the tip of your lungs. That hurt, if possible, even more, men som mor alltid sier: ”Vondt skal vondt fordrive”
    The austrians use freshly grated horseradish in a number of dishes, lastly I was served a soup made of potatoes and pickled cucumbers, topped with freshly grated horseradish. It sounds a bit funky, but is actually very tasty!

    Reply
  5. Yuliya P.
    20 oktober, 2013

    What a great recipe! My husband and I love horseraddish. In Ukraine we make it with raw beets.

    Reply
  6. Kathleen
    21 oktober, 2013

    Hello Elenore, I was so curious about horseradish and growing it and cooking it so it was so timely that you just wrote about this! I am trying your recipe tomorrow. Thank you and Congratulations!
    Kathleen

    Reply
  7. Krista
    21 oktober, 2013

    For me, an introvert, I need to get alone regularly to connect with myself, to silence other voices, to let myself just be so can evaluate those walls you speak of. I went through a lot of abuse in my young adult and adult life, and for a while I had to keep very thick, high walls in place while I healed and got strong. Now, much to my delight, I am strong enough and brave enough to start dismantling them, creating doorways and windows to let it that lovely new air you wrote about. :-) Thank you for reminding me how important this is. XO

    Reply
  8. Katie @ Whole Nourishment
    21 oktober, 2013

    Thanks for a great recipe and sharing such honest, raw thoughts that apply to all of our lives! I also think a lot about what is real and how I am limiting myself in life. Have found it helpful to respect and appreciate how powerful our minds are (for the better or worse) and to remind myself that our perceptions of reality are often responses to underlying self-doubt and insecurities. But then digging deeper, realizing this insecurity and negative self talk is not rooted in reality (!), but in perceptions only. And this gives me the courage and confidence to keep going. :)

    Reply
  9. Röksí
    21 oktober, 2013

    This was so profound. I love when you post things like this; bare honesty and nourishing deliciousness. I’m going to be thinking about this for a while.

    Reply
  10. Lana
    21 oktober, 2013

    A breath of fresh air as always Elenore! Wonderful. Another timely reminder for me to follow my intuition, regardless of the barriers I have to break down to do so (and it is a tough one, remembering that!). It is so easy to get ourselves pent up in our own little box, our realm of reality, what we deem is possible or impossible.. ahh. Time to let it go! Thank you xoxo

    Reply
  11. Kathleen
    25 oktober, 2013

    Love this with the horseradish! Thank you so much. I was wondering how to make Farro also and make it more lively and fun. I also loved the pic of yourself too! I read your blog all the time and pass it onto my friends in Los Angeles, and we’re big fans!

    Reply
  12. Weekend Reading, 10.27.13
    27 oktober, 2013

    […] Elenore’s Warm Whole Bean Farro Salad with Horseradish Cream […]

    Reply
  13. Rebecca Jane
    28 oktober, 2013

    Oh Elenore, i feel like i’ve been hiding in my little box made of to- do list paper walls for a bit too long now. I can feel the magic trickling through the seams but i’ve yet to shake the whole god damn thing down. Your post is both a reminder and an encouragement to stir things up. To put the heat under my cauldron and see what potions i can concoct.

    Thanks for being a shining star in a world that can rely too heavily on grey xxxx

    Reply
  14. Hannah
    20 augusti, 2014

    I saw beautiful borlotti pods at the market today and immediately came back to this recipe. But I’m sure I spotted those beans for a reason because re-reading the first part of this post is so incredibly applicable to my life right now. I need to tear down all the barriers of how I see myself, how I narrate my life and my identity and start to lose control :)

    Reply
    • ElenoreEarth
      23 augusti, 2014

      What a beautiful thing + reminder. The universe provides, eh?! Love to you Hannah!

      Reply

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